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Jaguarundi

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 Serval
 Bay Cat
 Marbled Cat
 Asian Golden Cat
 African Golden Cat
 Caracal


Jaguarundi


Jaguarundi Range Map (S USA & S America)
Jaguarundi Range Map (S USA & S America)


Jaguarundi
Latin Name Puma yagouaroundi
Conservation Status Least Concern
Location South USA & South America
Colour See Below
Length 55 - 77 cms (22 - 30 inches)
Tail 33 - 60 cms (13 - 23.5 inches)
Weight 4.5 - 9 Kgs (10 - 20 lbs)
Life Expectancy

15 Yrs

Main Characteristics

Jaguarundis are small cats that that appear to be more like mustelids than felids in their overall proportions. They have a body length between 55 and 77 cms (22 - 30 inches), a tail length of between 33 and 60 cms (13 - 23.5 inches) and they weigh between 4.5 and 9 Kgs (10 - 20 lbs).

They have a long slender body, short legs, small rounded ears and a long tail. Their fur is short and sleek, and they are uniform in colour with a paler underside. They have three colour forms: Black, Brown/Grey and Red/Chestnut. The darker colours are more likely to be found in the forest regions while the lighter colours are more likely to be found in the dry regions.

Habitat

Jaguarundis live in lowland brush areas, savannah and forest regions of South USA and South America.

The males have a territory of 80 - 100 Kms (45 - 56 miles) and females 15 - 20 Kms (8 - 11 miles). They are solitary animals but they are known to live in pairs if their territories overlap.

They are good climbers and are comfortable in trees but they prefer to be on the ground, particularly to hunt.

Diet

A Jaguarundis diet consists of fish, frogs, reptiles, birds, rodents and small mammals.

Breeding

After a gestation period of 70 - 75 days Jaguarundis give birth to a litter of 1 - 4 kittens. The kittens are spotted when they are born but these disappear as they get older.

The kittens are weaned at about 2 months after which their mother will teach them how to hunt and fend for themselves. They will become independent at around 10 months and they will reach sexual maturity at approximately 2 - 3 years of age.

Predators

Jaguarundis main predators are man and large carnivores.

Subspecies


There are eight subspecies of Jaguarundi. Below is a list of them and their locations:

Puma yaguarondi armeghinoi
Western Argentina, Far-Eastern Chile

Puma yaguarondi cacomitli
South Texas and Eastern Mexico

Puma yaguarondi eyra
Brazil, Paraguay and Argentina

Puma yaguarondi fossata
Southern Mexico to Honduras

Puma yaguarondi melantho
Peru and Brazil

Puma yaguarondi panamensis
Nicaragua to Ecuador

Puma yaguarondi tolteca
Arizona and Western Mexico

Puma yaguarondi yagouaroundi
Guyana and Amazon Rainforest

Interesting Facts

Jaguarundis are very good swimmers.

Jaguarundis are also known as:
Leoncillo (Little Lion)
Otter Cat



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